Upwork Telephone Etiquette Certification Test Questions

Question:01
Why is 'Privacy' considered one of the 7 Pillars of Telephone usage, and generally important when making calls?


a. It makes the call important and secure to both parties, especially when it is a business call.
b. People like things to be private and secretive - it makes them feel special, like they are tricking the world.
c. It's not - privacy should always be secondary to communication and letting everyone know as much as possible.
d. The information could be damaging if leaked into the wrong hands, especially in the case of financial or legal decisions.e. a and d


Question:02
When you are addressing a woman and are unsure of her marital status, which of the following titles should you use?


a. Ms.
b. Miss
c. Mrs.
d. Mr.
e. None of the above


Question:03
When is it acceptable to use the 'silent' mode on your cell phone?


a. When you do not want to disturb others around you.
b. When you are expecting an important call, and do not wish others to be interrupted.
c. When you wish to be notified by your phone without it ringing and alerting everybody in the room, or wherever you are.
d. When you wish to attend a meeting or a public event, but still wish to know when you have been called or received a voicemail or text message.
e. All of the above


Question:04
Which of the following is probably the worst way to end a business call?


a. "Don't call us, we'll call you."
b. "Thanks for your time. Not."
c. "See ya in the next life."
d. Just hang up.
e. They are all equally bad.


Question:05
Which of the following should be considered while leaving a voice mail message?


a. Leaving a message that is short and to the point.
b. Being polite and giving a sense of what is expected in return.
c. Leaving as much information as possible, relatively briefly.
d. Speaking clearly and succinctly.
e. All of the above


Question:06
Why is it not a good idea to always leave a lengthy voicemail message?


a. The message can be truncated, and therefore not communicated properly.
b. The message may experience a long delay in reaching its destination.
c. Part of the message may become scrambled and be harder to hear
d. There is risk of the message not being recorded at all, as it is a greater challenge for the cell phone recording technology.
e. All of the above


Question:07
What does 'screening your calls' mean?


a. Choosing which calls to answer, and which not to answer, based on the name or number (or absence of a number) that shows up when about to receive the call.
b. Applying a safety cover to your cell phone, often a transparent plastic cover called a 'screen'.
c. Making a list of all the calls you've received in the last month, in order to calculate if your cell phone bill is accurate or not.
d. Deleting all the missed calls, received calls and dialled numbers from your cell phone.


Question:08
Which of the following sentences are appropriate when you are asking for somebody on the phone?


a. Yo, Mr. Jones
b. Hello, could you please connect me to Mr. Jones?
c. Get me Mr. Jones, please
d. Good morning, I was wondering if I could speak to Mr. Jones?
e. b and d


Question:09
Which of the following is not an active listening word that will let the party know that you are attentive to their phone call?

a. "Yes"
b. "What?"
c. "Great"
d. "I see"


Question:
10
How can you convey to your listener that you need to discuss sensitive issues over the phone, such as the exchange of personal and protected information?


a. Tell them you will fax the details.
b. Tell them you will email the details, although it might be by unsecured e-mail.
c. Confirm with them whether it is okay to discuss such issues before discussing them.
d. Avoid these discussions at all costs on the telephone.


Question:12
Which of the following is considered polite if you have an interruption while speaking to a caller?


a. Excuse me for a moment, please, I will be back in a matter of seconds. Is that okay?
b. Wait 5 minutes, will you.
c. Got to go — I'll call you back later.
d. Wait there, I'll back.


Question:13
You should not talk about personal issues on a business call until you have established a personal relationship with your business contact?


a. True
b. False
c. Irrelevant issue for cell phones
d. You should always personalize the call before talking business, even if just telling a joke.
e. None of the above

[If you get any answers above all the Questions please send us to Ask.Qposter@gmail.com]
[We show here some Questions of  Telephone Etiquette Certification Test of oDesk Please prepare yourself before attending into real odesk examination. So, You should know more about it and have to practice more and more]

What is telephone etiquette?

“Polite response to callers. Manners are important in first impressions and often a caller's first impression of a company is with the receptionist of operator.

An individual who initiates a telephone call should always be prepared to identify them self when the call is answered, especially if the person who answers is not the person the caller intends to speak to, or if there is certainly a chance that your voice will not be recognized. In other words, it is generally considered impolite to simply ask to speak to someone else without first identifying one's self. This is true whether the call is made to a residence or a business, or when leaving a voice recorded message.

For example, when a call is answered, the caller might say "Hello, my name is Mary Todd. Is Martha there? May I speak to her?" Or "Hello Mrs Thompson, is Jack able to come to the phone?" Never start a conversation by saying "Are you Jack Burns?", because if Jack Burns doesn't know who you are, he may be wondering whether the call is friendly and if it is safe to give his name to a complete stranger.

When leaving a message on a telephone voice recorder, do not simply say "Call me" or "Call me back". Give a reason why you want that person to call you back. For example, you might say "...I want to ask what plans you have for the holiday", or "...I thought we might just catch up on things." Otherwise, without explaining the purpose of your call, you may be creating concern or worry for the other person.” Source: wiki.answers.com


“Telephone etiquette refers to a set of rules that apply when people make calls to others or when they are receiving a phone call. There are slightly different rules for a variety of situations. Making and receiving personal calls are not the same as making/receiving business calls. Within this set of rules there can be differences, especially for business calls where companies may want callers or receivers to say certain things.

For personal telephone etiquette, calling someone means doing several things. A caller should identify him/herself when not recognized right away. In calling a friend or relative, for instance, after the initial “Hello,” the caller should come up with a greeting and identification. “Hello/Hi this is John.” Sometimes a last name is needed if the person being called is an acquaintance or a business representative.
The next thing that is needed in telephone etiquette is a request for something, such as speaking to someone else in the house. Variations exist on this like “May I speak to Horatio,” or “Is Horatio available?” If Horatio is not available, it may be necessary to leave a brief message, but it should be one easy to right down. Sometimes the only thing necessary is to leave a phone number.

Even this simple telephone etiquette takes a while to learn. It’s a good thing to teach children, as they often don’t know it, can’t identify themselves, and won’t leave any form of concrete message. Children should also be taught how to answer a phone, and all people can benefit from the following some standard etiquette concepts, including:

• Pick up the phone promptly with a salutation like “Hello,” and not “Yeah” or “Go!”
• Be prepared to take a message and always have pencil/pen and paper handy.
• If the call is undesired, as from a solicitor, merely inform the person in an even tone that there is no interest for the product or service, say goodbye, and gently hang up.
• Alternately, screen calls and let unwanted calls go to voicemail.

Business telephone etiquette is similar in many ways to home phone calls and reception. Yet, the business should be even more vested in remaining polite, since poor phone manners can have a negative effect on business reputation. Calling out from a business is similar to a personal call. The person should begin with a greeting, identify self, and identify employer. This should then be met with a concise statement or request to speak to someone.

At this point, a message may need to be given and it should include nature of business and contact information. This isn’t always possible because, due to privacy laws, certain businesses can only talk to the person they are trying to reach. When such is the case, simply trying back later or leaving contact information may be the most a caller can do.

In receiving the business call, a businessperson also attempts to be polite, understand the caller’s needs, and take messages if required. There tends to be a code for both businesses and personal calls when claiming someone cannot come to the phone that relates to where the unavailable person is. People should not disclose the desire of the unavailable person not to speak to a caller or any private location like showers/ bathrooms/ doctors visits of that person. Instead, simple statements that the person isn’t available are enough.

Every phone call is an attempt at communication between two people; it’s a method for imparting and receiving information. When telephone etiquette isn’t observed, communication may be thwarted. In general, people are asked to keep language more standard, as opposed to using slang, to be polite to each other, and to make it clear who caller and receiver are. While it may be okay from time to time to depart from etiquette, especially when calling very well known friends, greater adherence to it is useful.”

Source: wisegeek.com



Learn more about proper telephone etiquette.


“The telephone; it is part of us. What would we do without it? It is as common as apple pie and summer sunshine. As much a part of our lives as learning to walk and talk and perhaps that is why we, at most times, give it little thought. Nonetheless, we do think about it, when we have had the experience of being treated rudely or abruptly while using this mode of communication. We bristle at the idea of someone's brusqueness to us, and most probably never take thought of the times we have shown our bad manners while speaking on the telephone.

The tendency to be short and curt to salespersons is common. The feeling that they are, in fact, invading our privacy is a widespread notion and the fist inclination is to cut them off with a positive projection of irritation. Perhaps supposing this will discourage any return calls, "wish on!" Treating those person who call pitching a product without kindness, solves nothing and makes no validity, so why not include them in you simple and polite response, "no thank you, have a good day," "good-bye." This response is much less apt to raise your blood pressure and reduce your feelings of guilt later, for incivility over the telephone.

Correct way to answer the telephone:

The proper way to answer the telephone is "hello." On the other hand, simply answering "yes" is a curt and inappropriate response. The person making the call draws a very quick conclusion, and that is, to think of that person as cold and aloof, and hesitate to communicate readily.

At times, someone other than the head of the house will answer the telephone. If that person is asked, "may I speak to Mr. ________ please," the response should be, "one moment please, I will get him for you." If the head of household is not available the response should be, "I am sorry, Mr. _____ is not available at this time, may I take a message?" This is simply a form of good manners, whatever form it may be expressed, thoughtfulness for the feelings of others. This person may be calling to offer a new job with great pay and benefits, who's to know! What would he or she think if the answer to the question, "is Mr. _____ home please," would be an abrupt "no." This response would reflect negatively, on the actual person being called.
Making telephone calls:

Think about what time it is, when placing a call. You would not want to call when there is the possibility that person may be asleep. For example on a work morning before 7:00 a.m. would not be a good time. After 9:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the evening is not a good time, and remember to avoid calls around the usual period most people will be eating. Courtesy is expected when using the telephone just as if you are talking in person.


Give your name when the telephone is answered, before asking for the person you are requesting.
Dialing too quickly, or in inadequate lighting may be the cause of dialing a "wrong number," never just hang-up. Express your apology, letting them know you have dialed a wrong number. To avoid disturbing another person unnecessarily dial carefully and make sure you can see the dial pad.
When speaking, think of the way you sound. Make sure you enunciate you words clearly and precisely. It is embarrassing to be asked to repeat what you are saying. Your voice reflects your courtesy, since that person on the other end of the line cannot see your facial expressions your "tone of voice" will need to express this.


Basic Good Manners, Telephone Tips:


* Let the telephone ring a reasonable length of time. It is frustrating to just get to the telephone and hear a dial tone.

* If you dial a number that is wrong, apologize, promptly and hang-up.

* Calling a business at or very near closing time is to say the least un-thoughtful. When it is time to go home, after a long day, do not delay them.

* State your name when placing a call. The game of "guess who this is" may not play very well to a busy friend.

* When speaking to anyone who is working and time is of the essence, make your call informative and short.

*Dial carefully and in proper lighting to avoid calling a wrong number and in-conveniencing others.”
Source: essortment.com



Telephone Etiquette Tips:


“1. Ask the caller, "May I know who I am speaking to?"

2. Avoid unnecessary jargon and acronyms in your conversations.

3. Use the caller's name in your conversation.

4. Practice good listening skills.

5. Make sure you speak clearly and are smiling as you answer the phone; also identify yourself.

6. Before placing a caller on hold, ask their permission first and thank them.

7. It is better to return a call than to keep someone on hold too long. If the phone rings back to you, you've kept them on hold too long.

8. Do not forget to return the call as you promised.

9. Do not permit the phone to ring into the office more than three times.

10. Always use a pleasant, congenial and friendly tone.

11. Never interrupt the person while he/she is talking to you.

12. Never engage in an argument with a caller.

13. Do not handle an unhappy caller's concern openly at the check-in and check-out desk.

14. Do not make it a habit of receiving personal calls at work.

15. Do not answer the phone if you are eating or chewing gum.

16. Do not give the impression that you are rushed. It is better to return the call when you can give the person the time they need to handle the reason for their call.

17. Learn how to handle several callers simultaneously with ease and grace.

18. Return calls promptly that have been left on voice mail and voicemail.

19. Always get the best number (and an alternate) and the best time to have a call returned to the caller, especially if a manager or another team member must return the call.

20. Do not ever leave a message with someone else or on an voice-mail regarding details of a delinquent account. Instead, leave a message asking the person to call the "Accounting Department."

21. Always make collection calls in private and away from the patient flow or public areas.

22. If possible, provide a telephone for patients/customers/clients to use. An area providing privacy is preferred.

23. Do not call a patient, customer or client's home before 8:00AM or after 9:00PM, unless they've given you permission to do so.

24. When hanging up the phone, make sure the caller or person called hangs up first if the phone is slammed on the receiver. Otherwise, always hang up the phone, gently. It is recommended a remote, handless headset for the business staff. They are wonderful.

25. This will solve hanging up as you push release on the headset to hang up the phone. Also, it does not tie your staff to their desk. The team member checking on insurance really appreciates this device. (The phone can also be answered if away from your desk.)

26. When you take a call, turn away from your computer, desk, and other work. Don't allow other distractions to take your attention away from the caller.

27. Always have something available to write with.

28. Answer calls by the second or third ring.

29. Smile when you answer your calls. Even though the caller can't see it, they'll hear the smile in your voice.

30. Use a "telephone voice" in which you control your volume and speed. Speak clearly.

31. Be enthusiastic and respectful.

32. If there is a problem, be concerned, empathetic, and apologetic.

33. Thank the caller for calling. Ask them to call again.

34. Never eat, drink, or chew gum while you are on a call.

These were some tips on telephone etiquette. It is important that you remember these while conversing with someone over the phone. Not only would it help to present yourself in a better way, but it will also ensure that you put across yourself positively.”

Source: buzzle.com/articles/telephone-etiquette-tips.html




20 Business Telephone Etiquette Tips for customer service:


“1. Make sure you speak clearly and are smiling as you answer the phone; also identify yourself.

2. Before placing a caller on hold, ask their permission first and thank them.

3. It is better to return a call than to keep someone on hold too long. If the phone rings back to you, you've kept them on hold too long.

4. Do not forget to return the call as you promised.

5. Do not permit the phone to ring into the office more than three times.

6. Always use a pleasant, congenial and friendly tone.

7. Never interrupt the person while he/she is talking to you.

8. Never engage in an argument with a caller.

9. Do not handle an unhappy caller's concern openly at the checkin/checkout desk.

10. Do not make it a habit of receiving personal calls at work.

11. Do not answer the phone if you are eating or chewing gum.

12. Do not give the impression that you are rushed. It is better to return the call when you can give the person the time they need to handle the reason for their call.

13. Learn how to handle several callers simultaneously with ease and grace.

14. Return calls promptly that have been left on voice mail and ansafones.

15. Always get the best number (and an alternate) and the best time to have a call returned to the caller, especially if a manager or another team member must return the call.

16. Do not ever leave a message with someone else or on an ansafone or voice mail regarding details of a delinquent account. Instead, leave a message asking the person to call the "Accounting Department."

17. Always make collection calls in private and away from the patient flow or public areas.

18. If possible, provide a telephone for patients/customers/clients to use. An area providing privacy is preferred.

19. Do not call a patient, customer or client's home before 8:00AM or after 9:00PM, unless they've given you permission to do so.

20. When hanging up the phone, make sure the caller or person called hangs up first if the phone is slammed on the receiver. Otherwise, always hang up the phone, gently.”

Source: ustomerservicemanager.com/20-business-telephone-etiquette-tips.htm

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